Meadowsweet – a meadow plant that prefers moist areas, this plant is native to Europe and Asia, but is naturalized in the Northeastern U.S. and Canada.  Meadowsweet belongs to the Rosacea (Rose) family and its Latin name is Filipendula ulmaria. Its previous Latin genus name of Spirea is where the word aspirin was thought to originate, since this plant contains salicylates that were the basis for the drug aspirin.  From this history, one can deduce that this plant can help with inflammation and with pain.  The leaf & flower (upper part of the plant in flower) are used medicinally.
Primary properties: anti-inflammatory, antirheumatic, antacid, antiemetic, carminative, astringent, analgesic, antiulcer, diuretic, antimicrobial, immune modulator, diaphoretic, anticoagulant, mild bitter.
Based on its primary properties, meadowsweet is indicated in hyperacidic conditions of the stomach, such as GERD (gastroesophageal reflux disease), often experienced as “heartburn” because of the stomach acid entering the unprotected esophagus, and for helping heal ulcers and the associated pain.  It is also useful for helping to calm an upset stomach, relieve nausea and indigestion, and dispel gas and bloating.
Meadowsweet is a good anti-inflammatory, helping with inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract as well as joint and muscle inflammation and pain, including arthritis and other rheumatic pains.
As a member of the Rose family, the meadowsweet leaf has the characteristic astringent properties, toning and strengthening tissues, especially of the gastrointestinal tract.
The anti-inflammatory effect of meadowsweet is combined with its supportive, healing effect on the stomach and the anticoagulant (blood thinning) properties, therefore making this herb a potential great alternative to the “baby aspirin” a day some people choose.
The tea and tincture are most often used.  The tea is a pleasant-tasting one that can be mixed with other herbs, such as marshmallow root or slippery elm for their antacid and anti-inflammatory properties or with elder berries and Echinacea to help break a fever and boost the immune system, or taken alone.

Marshmallow – a plant that grows well in wet, marshy areas and is native to salt marshes along the ocean in Europe and western Asian, its Latin name is Althea officinalis and it is a member of the Malvaceae (Mallow) family.  The leaf and root are both used medicinally.  It is highly likely that the name of the store-bought marshmallows you are familiar with was derived from this plant.  The root is high in mucilaginous carbohydrates that can be soaked, whipped into a froth, and then sweetened – probably the origin of the marshmallow as we know it today.
Primary properties: demulcent, emollient, diuretic, anti-inflammatory
Based on the above primary properties of marshmallow, this plant can be used in to soothe and cool inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract, including a sore throat, acid reflux, and in cases of gastritis or colitis in the stomach or intestines.  Both the root and leaf can be used for this purpose, although the root is more mucilaginous (slippery, mucus-forming) than the leaf.  The root and leaf both stimulate a reflex action whereby the lungs and urinary tract can also be soothed and cooled.  Therefore, marshmallow is useful in cases of dry coughs and to help soothe the burning pain of urinary tract infections.  Topically, the root or leaf can both act as an emollient, moisturizing and protecting the skin, as well as soothing and cooling a dry, hot skin condition such as a rash or burn.
The root can be taken in powder form, in which case you are consuming the whole root, by shaking in water or juice and swallowing, or by taking as a capsule.  The root and leaf can also both be used in a tea.  A “cold infusion” will get more of the cooling mucilage/carbohydrate in the tea, so you can soak the root or leaf in cold water for several hours to overnight and drink the fluid.  Tincture is the least-preferred method for using this plant, although as a diuretic and anti-inflammatory, it will still be useful.

Lemon balm – a member of the mint family, this plant grows well in the cool, temperate climate of the Pacific Northwest. Its Latin name is Melissa officinalis, and its leaves are used medicinally and are full of volatile/essential oils with a lemony scent.  As is the case with most plants that are a member of the Lamiaceae (Mint) family, this herb has an affinity for the nervous system and the digestive tract.  Because our stomach and intestines are highly innervated (surrounded with nerves), this herb can help relax the nerves and smooth muscle around the intestines, calming a nervous/anxious or tense stomach and helping to dispel gas and bloating.
Lemon balm’s primary actions in the body are: nervine, antispasmodic, carminative, antidepressant, anti-anxiety (calming), antimicrobial (including antiviral), diaphoretic, and hypotensive.
Based on these primary actions, lemon balm is indicated for both anxiety and depression and for nervous heart palpitations and digestive upset.  It is a fabulous calming herb, considered cooling and sedative, gentle enough for children to help promote restful sleep.  It is used during colds & flu for its diaphoretic action, helping to break fevers and promote rest.  Its antimicrobial properties also make it a beneficial herb or use during viral or bacterial infections, particularly as a hot tea where it can promote perspiration.
Lemon balm is also one of the few herbs that is indicated for use in hyperthyroidism.  One herbalist, Sharol Tilgner, found that the fresh juice was most helpful for this (she would press and freeze the juice in ice cube trays to be used when needed).
As a carminative, antispasmodic, and nervine, lemon balm is indicated when someone has gas, bloating, or general indigestion.  The volatile oils act locally on the smooth muscle surround the intestines to relax and promote passage of gas so there is not as much gripping and pain.
The essential oil has all of these properties, as well as being used in salves topically for its antiviral and anti-inflammatory effect for herpes/cold sores.
The fresh herb is the most flavorful, and if you have access to it in your yard or garden, use this to make a tea.  However, the dried herb will certainly suffice, using about 1 Tablespoon herb/cup of hot water and steeping approximately 10 minutes, and has a grassy, mild lemon-y flavor.  The tincture or glycerite (extract in vegetable glycerine) are also great, because they are extracts of the fresh plant.

Dandelion – a very common plant most people know for its sunny yellow flowers, its puffy seed heads that can be blown into the wind, or pulling it up in their yards when they see it as a blemish on their lawn, its Latin name is Taraxacum officinale and it is native to northern temperate zones around the globe.  The leaves and root of this plant are both used as medicine, and the leaves as food.  The leaves are best harvested fresh in the spring and can be eaten as a bitter salad green to stimulate digestive juices, as well as being an excellent diuretic.  The root can be harvested in the spring or fall and is used primarily as a digestive and liver tonic herb.
Historically, the leaves were eaten as a vegetable, the roots roasted and brewed as a coffee substitute, the root fermented into beer, and the flowers made into wine.
The leaves primary actions are: diuretic, bitter digestive, mineralizing (high in potassium in particular).
The roots primary actions are: liver tonic, liver detoxifier, digestive stimulant, diuretic, mild laxative, anti-rheumatic.
As a diuretic, the leaf is considered stronger in its action and contains enough potassium that it does not leach the body of this important mineral, as many pharmaceutical diuretics can do.  Therefore, both the leaf and root can be used to increase the flow of fluid through the kidneys, helping move kidney stones, lower blood pressure, and reduce edema (swelling due to water retention).
As a bitter digestive, the leaf is more bitter tasting, but both have this action, which is basically stimulating the flow of digestive juices through the reflex action of the bitter taste on the tongue.  They stimulate bile flow, the mucosal lining of the stomach and intestines to secrete mucus, and the pancreas to secrete enzymes.  This is useful when someone has sluggish or poor digestion and dyspepsia (digestive discomfort), particularly when taken before meals.
The root more so than the leaf, is considered a liver tonic, helping to promote liver health and to detoxify the liver through stimulating it to release toxins that can then be excreted.
This plant also has some anti-inflammatory effects, and combined with its action on the liver and digestion as well as fluid excretion, it is used for joint inflammation and other rheumatic complaints.  The root is also commonly used in formulas for skin conditions, because of its action on the liver and kidneys, two primary detoxification organs that can help take the burden off the skin to detoxify when its experiencing inflamed skin conditions such as eczema or acne.
Dandelion is also useful for overall stagnation in the body with symptoms of poor skin with a dull color, slow or poor digestion, lethargy or fatigue, swollen or inflamed tissues and organs, and poor circulation.  In these cases, dandelion works by helping to move the blood and eliminating toxins from the body
Traditionally, dandelion was not recommended in patients with liver or gallbladder disease, based on the belief that dandelion stimulates bile secretion.  Dandelion leaf and root should be used cautiously with people who have gallstones or any obstruction of the bile ducts.  Dandelion should also be used cautiously in the case of stomach ulcers or gastritis, as it may cause overproduction of stomach acid.
Dandelion root and leaf are both sold loose at Herban Wellness to be used in teas, they are also both sold in liquid extract (tincture) form, and in capsule form.  The roasted dandelion root is also sold to make into a tea that has a rich, roasted flavor.  Dandelion root is included in my Rebalancing Cleanse Support Tea, helping to promote movement of toxins out through the liver and kidneys.