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Meadowsweet – a meadow plant that prefers moist areas, this plant is native to Europe and Asia, but is naturalized in the Northeastern U.S. and Canada.  Meadowsweet belongs to the Rosacea (Rose) family and its Latin name is Filipendula ulmaria. Its previous Latin genus name of Spirea is where the word aspirin was thought to originate, since this plant contains salicylates that were the basis for the drug aspirin.  From this history, one can deduce that this plant can help with inflammation and with pain.  The leaf & flower (upper part of the plant in flower) are used medicinally.
Primary properties: anti-inflammatory, antirheumatic, antacid, antiemetic, carminative, astringent, analgesic, antiulcer, diuretic, antimicrobial, immune modulator, diaphoretic, anticoagulant, mild bitter.
Based on its primary properties, meadowsweet is indicated in hyperacidic conditions of the stomach, such as GERD (gastroesophageal reflux disease), often experienced as “heartburn” because of the stomach acid entering the unprotected esophagus, and for helping heal ulcers and the associated pain.  It is also useful for helping to calm an upset stomach, relieve nausea and indigestion, and dispel gas and bloating.
Meadowsweet is a good anti-inflammatory, helping with inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract as well as joint and muscle inflammation and pain, including arthritis and other rheumatic pains.
As a member of the Rose family, the meadowsweet leaf has the characteristic astringent properties, toning and strengthening tissues, especially of the gastrointestinal tract.
The anti-inflammatory effect of meadowsweet is combined with its supportive, healing effect on the stomach and the anticoagulant (blood thinning) properties, therefore making this herb a potential great alternative to the “baby aspirin” a day some people choose.
The tea and tincture are most often used.  The tea is a pleasant-tasting one that can be mixed with other herbs, such as marshmallow root or slippery elm for their antacid and anti-inflammatory properties or with elder berries and Echinacea to help break a fever and boost the immune system, or taken alone.

Marshmallow – a plant that grows well in wet, marshy areas and is native to salt marshes along the ocean in Europe and western Asian, its Latin name is Althea officinalis and it is a member of the Malvaceae (Mallow) family.  The leaf and root are both used medicinally.  It is highly likely that the name of the store-bought marshmallows you are familiar with was derived from this plant.  The root is high in mucilaginous carbohydrates that can be soaked, whipped into a froth, and then sweetened – probably the origin of the marshmallow as we know it today.
Primary properties: demulcent, emollient, diuretic, anti-inflammatory
Based on the above primary properties of marshmallow, this plant can be used in to soothe and cool inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract, including a sore throat, acid reflux, and in cases of gastritis or colitis in the stomach or intestines.  Both the root and leaf can be used for this purpose, although the root is more mucilaginous (slippery, mucus-forming) than the leaf.  The root and leaf both stimulate a reflex action whereby the lungs and urinary tract can also be soothed and cooled.  Therefore, marshmallow is useful in cases of dry coughs and to help soothe the burning pain of urinary tract infections.  Topically, the root or leaf can both act as an emollient, moisturizing and protecting the skin, as well as soothing and cooling a dry, hot skin condition such as a rash or burn.
The root can be taken in powder form, in which case you are consuming the whole root, by shaking in water or juice and swallowing, or by taking as a capsule.  The root and leaf can also both be used in a tea.  A “cold infusion” will get more of the cooling mucilage/carbohydrate in the tea, so you can soak the root or leaf in cold water for several hours to overnight and drink the fluid.  Tincture is the least-preferred method for using this plant, although as a diuretic and anti-inflammatory, it will still be useful.